Most visitors to Vietnam are overwhelmed by the sublime beauty of the country's natural setting: the Red River Delta in the north, the Mekong Delta in the south and almost the entire coastal strip are covered with brilliant green rice paddies.

 

There are some beautiful beaches along the coast, soaring mountains and some dense tropical forests in inlands.  Vietnam also offers an opportunity to see a country of traditional charm and rare beauty rapidly opening up to the outside world.  Vietnam has two World Natural Heritage sites: Halong Bay and Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park.

 

Vietnam features a warm humid subtropical climate with plentiful precipitation.  It has typical tropical climate where summers are hot and humid, and winters are relatively cool and dry. Summers, lasting from May to September, are hot and humid, receiving the majority of the annual 1,680 millimetres (66.1 in) of rainfall.  The winters are short, relatively dry, and mild, while spring can bring light rains.

 

Hanoi is the capital of Vietnam and the second largest city after Ho Chi Minh city. It has estimated population nearly 6.5 million (2009).  October 2010 officially mark 1000 years of the establishment of Hanoi.  On this occasion, Hanoi has been named by Frommer's travel guide as one of the world's "Top Destinations 2010".  Ho Chi Minh City also known as Saigon is the largest city in Vietnam.  The city center is situated on the banks of the Saigon River, 60 kilometers from the South China Sea.

 

Climate & Weather
Vietnam stretches over 1,800 km from north to south, with an area of 332,000 square km, Vietnam's topography varies from coastal plains to mountain ranges, therefore weather patterns in the principle cities are very different.
North: Winter lasts from November to April, with temperatures averaging 10 - 16C, fog and drizzle in January - March. Summer begins in May and lasts until October, with an average temperature of 30C, heavy rainfall and the occasional violent typhoon.
Center: Central Vietnamexperiences a transitional climate, with heavy rainfalls between November and December and dry, hot summer months. Typhoons are quite common in coastal areas between July and November.
South: Temperatures are fairly constant through the year; 25C - 30C. Seasons are determined by the rains - the dry season runs from November to April and the wet season from May to October. The hottest period is March and April.
Highland areas: In the hill resorts of Dalat (1,500 m), Buon Me Thuot and Sapa, nights are cool throughout the year, and in the winter months, October to March, it can be distinctly chilly with temperatures falling to 0C. Even in the hottest months of March and April the temperature rarely exceeds 26C.
More details on weather, please visit:http://www.wunderground.com


Customs and Formalities
All visitors to Vietnam must fill in declaration forms and show their luggage to customs officials on request.
Visitors can bring with them unlimited amounts of foreign currency, objects made of gold, silver, precious metals and gemstones or plated with silver or gold, all of which must be declared in detail on the customs forms. Commercial Video films and printed materials that are considered offensive are normally confiscated and sent to Ministry of Culture for inspection.
Goods prohibited to import: weapons, ammunition, explosives, military technical equipment, drugs, toxic chemicals, debauched and reactionary products, firecrackers of all kinds, toys with negative impacts on the dignity education, social security and safety, cigarettes beyond the stipulated quantity, etc.
Goods prohibited to export: weapons, ammunition, explosives, military technical equipment, antiques, drugs, toxic chemicals, wild animals, rare and precious animals and plants, documents related to the national security, etc.

 

What to bring
Bring as little as possible. Keep in mind that you can and will buy things in Vietnam, so do not burden yourself. If you do forget to bring any ‘essential’ items, it’s quite likely that they can be bought in Vietnam, at least in the cities.

Currency, Exchange and ATM
The local currency is the Dong (abbreviated "d" or VND). Bank notes are 100d, 200d, 500d, 1000d, 2,000d, 5,000d, 10,000d, 20,000d, 50,000d, 100,000d & 500,000d. Coins are 200d, 500d, 1000d, 2000d and 5000d.
Further details on exchange rate, please visit: http://www.vietcombank.com.vn/en/Exchange%20Rate.asp
Money and travelers cheques, particularly U.S. Dollars, can be exchanged at banks, hotels and authorized money- exchangers. It is advisable to carry U.S. Dollar bills in small denominations.
Credit cards are generally only accepted in major hotels, and in some up-market shops and restaurants in major cities. ATM facilities are readily available now in major cities

 

Heath Requirements
No actual vaccinations are officially required. Visitors are advised to check with their doctor or travel immunization clinic regarding the advisability of inoculation against typhoid, tetanus, hepatitis A & B and Malaria.
Those visitors taking medicine for certain conditions such as diabetes or heart problems should make sure that they carry these medications in their hand luggage at all times in case the main luggage should be delayed.
It is recommended that all travellers take out comprehensive Personal Travel Insurance to cover personal belongings, in case of accident or illness etc.

Domestic Flights
If flights are required in your itinerary they are in coach class, unless specified otherwise. Flight timings quoted are local and are subject to change. Domestic flights require a check-in, 1-hour prior to the flight departure.
Carry on luggage is limited to one piece plus a camera. In economy class air travel baggage allowance is 20kg per person.
We cannot be held responsible for the loss or damage to passenger’s belongings. Domestic flights are prone to last minute schedule changes and cancellation without ANY advance notice.

 

AirportTax
Airport departure tax for international flights currently is: US$ 14 from Hanoi & HoChiMinhCity; US$ 8 from Danang
The departure airport tax may be paid in local currency or in US Dollars. Children under 12 years are entitled to have half fare of adult.
Airport departure tax for domestic flights is included in the airfare.

Internet
Vietnam joined the global computer age and internet-service providers are currently operating in most of the Cities. You can access the internet through hotels, Cyber Cafés & Internet/Computer Service Centers. ADSL technology is widely used in major cities.

Language
Vietnamese is the official language of Vietnam. Learning foreign languages, particularly English, is currently popular among young people in Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Hue, Danang and other cities. Tourist guides are available for English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, Japanese and Russian speakers.

 

Local Time and Working Hour
Local time is GMT + 7 hours.
Governmental agencies work Monday to Friday from 7.30amto 4.30pm(excluding one-hour lunch) and are closed Saturday and Sunday.
Banks are open Monday to Friday from 7.30amor 8am to 11.30amand from 1pmto 4pmand are closed Saturday and Sunday.
Private shops are open from 8 or 8.30amto 9 or 10pm.

Overland Travel
The road system in Vietnamis reasonable in the main urban cities. The drives through the countryside can be a wonderful sightseeing experience. However, it must be noted that the roads are narrow and some may be poorly paved when outside the main cities, and as a consequence the drives can be rough and difficult at times.
The journey timings described in your itinerary are based on the usual amount of time a particular journey will take. However, please appreciate that not all roads can be checked for their condition throughout the year.
Most cars used are manufactured locally by Toyota, Honda and Ford and are for the most part comfortable and ideally suited to local roads. Smoking is not permitted in any vehicle, under any conditions. There is ample opportunity to smoke during photographic, luncheon and sightseeing stops.
If you decide to leave the hotel and go out on your own, there are various means of transport that you may like to take such as taxis or “cyclos”. If taking a taxi or “cyclo”, insist on the meter being switched on before you begin your journey. Due to an effort to stop pollution, most “cyclos” are pedaled as opposed to motor. It is suggested that you carry the name of your destination or hotel written in local language in the event your driver does not understand English. The staff at your hotel can assist you in this regard.

 

Passport and Visa
Travellers to Vietnam are required to hold a passport valid for at least six (06) months beyond the completion of their visit and must contain a valid visa.
Visas are usually issued by the passengers’ home country (against the visa’s approval number), which require the original passport, and 2 photos in order to issue a visa stamp.
Visas can also be obtained upon arrival at Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh Cityand Danang airports (Visa on Arrival), in which case the stamping fee will be quoted separately.
Visas on Arrival can be requested via Vietnam Impressive Travel in connection with the booking of travel arrangements to Vietnam.
Hotels might reserve the right to keep travel documents overnight at the reception for registration purpose.

Food
Vietnam has abundant food supplies and an elaborate cuisine. Cooking is seen as an art and some Vietnamese dishes have achieved international fame, including such traditional dishes as noodle soup (pho), pork sausage (gio lua), spring rolls (nem ran), and fish balls (cha ca). In addition to Vietnamese food, the larger hotels also serve a wide variety of Continental and Chinese cuisine. In the smaller cities, when the hotels only have one restaurant, ordering a-la-carte may involve a slight wait, consequently it is advised that you take advantage of the large and diverse buffets available at these hotels to minimize any delay.
Never drink water from the hotel tap, no matter what category of hotel you are staying in. Bottled mineral water is available at all hotels throughout Vietnam. Do not have any ice in your drinks as this is often made from water that has not been purified.

 

Post and Telecommunications
A regular international post service is available. In addition Express Mail Service (EMS) is available to more than 50 countries worldwide with a delivery time of 2 to 10 days.
Vietnam has high international telephone charges. It is important to check the exact amount with the hotel before making a call, as hotel surcharges are often imposed.
VOIP calls which help reduce call charges (for most of International calls from any destination within Vietnam and for domestic calls between the main cities of the country) are now available as well pre-paid internet & mobile card can be bought in the major cities.
Service providers for mobile phone network are GSM of Vinaphone, MobilePhone and Viettel while CDMA are EVNTelecom and S-Phone. Numbers begin with 091, 090, 098, 095, 096

Electricity
Electricity in Vietnam mostly runs at 220 V (50 Hz), but often you will find 110V (also at 50Hz). In the south, most outlets are US-style flat pins. In the north, most outlets are the Russian-inspired round pins, which usually carry 220V. Electrical sockets are two and three-prong.

 

Shopping
Foreign visitors to Vietnam have the opportunity to buy souvenirs made of rattan, gold, silver and stone. There is a diverse range of products, from woodenwares such as wooden buttons or sindora beds to lacquer paintings, bowls and chopsticks, bamboo screens and stone tea sets. Woven tapestries, “tho cam” handbags and other handicrafts are produced by the traditional skills of the women of ethnic minorities in such rural regions in the north as Sapa, Mai Chau and Dien Bien.

Bargaining & Tipping
Bargaining is advised to do when visit Vietnam. You should ask the taxi driver or motortaxi (xe om) driver for the price of your travel distance made. The same when you go shopping. When you are surrounded by street sellers, it is better to say no and mind your way.
Tipping is widely practiced and expected
Porters : VND 5.000 – 10.000 per bag
Waiters in restaurants: 5-10% of total bill
Taxi drivers : 10% of total bill
Tour guides :
VND 40.000 per person/per day
Drivers : VND 20.000 per person/per day


All of the above information is accurate at the time of publication.

Hanoi Excursions & Daily Tours
 

Private tour, daily departure
English/French speaking guide

(Indicate the Tour Code when booking a Day Tour)

 

As the capital of Vietnam for almost a thousand years, Hanoi is considered to be the cultural center of Vietnam, where every dynasty has left behind their imprint. Even though some relics have not survived through wars and time, the city still has many interesting cultural and historic monuments for visitors and residents alike.

Hanoi at Your Sight - Fullday (Tour code VI-1101)
 

Start at your hotel at 08:00, transfer to visit Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum from outside, his former residence, One Pillar Pagoda, Temple of Literature and Hoan Kiem Lake with Ngoc Son Temple.
In the afternoon, visit Ethnology Museum (closed on Monday) and explore Hanoi Old Streets by one hour cyclo ride.
Tour ends at your hotel at about 17:30.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$110

$70

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees
Cylco fee (one person/cyclo)
No lunch included

 

 


 

 

Traditional Handicraft Villages - Fullday (Tour code VI-1102)
 

08:00: pick up at your hotel, drive to visit Bat Trang Pottery Village - Bat Trang, which translates as 'bowl-making village' became famous for its bricks and for its bat dan, a type of bowl popular in the Red River Delta. Bat Trang was so well known that its bricks. The village's ceramics were finished with five types of glaze: iron brown, blue and white, ivory, moss green, and cracked. The most typical designs, and the ones that are most popular to this day, involve a combination of white and deep cobalt blue.
Back Hanoi then head to Van Phuc silk village - In Van Phuc, one is confronted with an initially bewildering array of silk products, from the raw materials, to ready-to-wear garments, to a myriad of silk accessories.
The local silk is known for its smooth and lightweight appearance, qualities that enable it to be dyed more colours to suit a variety of skin tones
Back to your hotel.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2012 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$110

$70

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Lunch at local restaurant

 

 

 

Village Life and Water Puppetry - Halfday in the afternoon (Tour code VI-1103)
 

15:00: pick up at your hotel, drive to visit Tay Tuu flower village - Proud daisies curtsey in the breeze, showing off their finest colours in the glare of the lights, while dainty roses hide shyly beneath paper covers, seeking warmth from the cold night air.
You will have chance to talk to the local villagers taking care and waterring flowers
18:30: Attend the unique Vietnamese art performance of water puppetry
19:30: Drop off at hotel by car. Trip ends.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$110

$70

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Water puppetry ticket cost
No lunch included


 

 

 

Hanoi, 36 Old Streets (Tour code VI-1104)
 

Start: North end of Hoan Kiem Lake (at the Ngoc Son Pagoda).
Finish: Return to the north end of Hoan Kiem Lake (to Dong Kinh Nghia Thuc Sq.).

Time: 1 1/2 hours without stops; up to 3 hours with exploring, coffee, and chatting.

Best Times: From early morning.

Worst Times: Middle of the day (too hot).

The best way to really experience Hanoi's Old Quarter is on foot. As you explore the route below, stop for coffee at a local cafe or a storefront geared to tourists in the backpacker area of the quarter. Stop for a chat; folks are busy but friendly if you take the time to connect. Photographers will want to set out early and catch the dynamic colors of the morning sun, which set off the rich yellowed plaster of older buildings and makes the colors of produce in the markets more vibrant.

This route is a large clockwise circle through the Old Quarter. Walking times vary depending on your clip and your interest in the details, but generally, allow a few hours. Note: Try to study the map discreetly and know your next turn before arriving at an intersection. If you ask for directions, motorbike taxi drivers will just implore you to hire them for a ride and even try to confuse you. Learn to look for distinct rooflines. Just a short time in the Old Quarter will have you distinguishing a Chinese temple or community house from a tube house or more French-influenced construction.

1. Hoan Kiem Lake
Start with a visit to the Ngoc Son pagoda on the north end of the lake. Cross the red Bridge of the Rising Sun to reach the temple. From this most prominent point in the city, follow the northern edge of the lake heading west and cross over the busy traffic circle. This busy square is known as the Dong Kinh Nghia Thuc Square (The Tonkin Free School Movement Sq.), named for the early-20th-century nationalist movement that would eventually spawn grassroots Communism in Vietnam.

West from the square is:

2. Hang Gai Street (Hemp St.)
This busy avenue marks the southern boundary of the Old Quarter. Hang Gai no longer supports hemp outlets as in days of old (the street would also host print shops and bookstores in the 19th c.) but is lined with boutique shopping, galleries, and silk tailors. Just a few hundred meters west of the traffic circle (on the left) you'll find a large banyan tree out in front of what was once a prominent communal house at no. 85 Hang Gai. The tree is one of the finest specimens of an old banyan in the city, a perfect example of nature's adaptability as heavy roots cleave large stones and masons have built around the old tree for centuries. The sight is like a small temple, with sticks of incense wedged between knobs of the tree and offerings of rice whiskey lining the base of the tree.

Turn right off of Hang Gai and look for a small street sign pointing to:

3. Tam Thuong Alley
Follow a few crooks in this quiet little alley and you come to the Yen Thai Communal House, a classic low tile roof over a wooden entry that gives way to a quiet courtyard. Just across the street are a few guesthouses popular with French backpackers. Tam Thuong terminates at Yen Thai Street where you'll make a left and, in the morning, walk through a small open-air market with great morning light for photography.

Turn right at the end of Yen Thai Street onto Hang Da Street:

4. Hang Da Market and Hang Dieu Street
At the intersection of Yen Thai and Hang Da is the Hang Da Market, which is a large, local dry-goods and clothing market. After a quick look, head north on Hang Da -- don't miss the large bird shop with a wall of bamboo cages on the northern corner of the Hang Da Market.

Continuing north, Hang Da becomes Hang Dieu Street. Hang Dieu was traditionally the area for tobacco and pipe sellers; keep an eye out for the filigreed colonial edifices at no. 66 and no. 77 Hang Dieu (you'll have to look up to distinguish these from the concrete clutter).

5. Take a Break--Bun Bo Nam Bo, at 67 Hang Dieu St. (tel. 04/923-0701), serves one of Hanoi's most popular one-dish noodle specialties.
Turn right off of Hang Dieu onto:

6. Bat Dan Street
This street once housed sellers of clay bowls that were brought to the city from riverside workshops along the Red River. No. 33 Bat Dan is a very ornate and colorful communal house.

Turn left (go north) on Thuoc Bac Street, once an area for traditional medicines. Then turn left (west) on:

7. Hang Phen Street
At the corner of Hang Phen and Bat Su, look for a preserved traditional house, characterized by its low tile roofline, at no. 52 Bat Su (also note the cozy little coffee shop on the corner, good for a rest and to watch the busy street life).
Carry on along Hang Phen until it becomes Cua Dong Street, which brings you to the eastern edge and wall of the Hanoi Citadel built by the Nguyen dynasty in the 1800s. Cua Dong Street terminates at the wall of the Hanoi Citadel.
Turn right off of Cua Dong onto:

8. Phung Hung Street
Running along the wall of the city's old citadel, what marks the western edge of the Old Quarter, Phung Hung Street is a notable sight among Vietnamese tourists for the publication offices of an important Communist paper at no. 105 Phung Hung. There's a plaque that notes this spot as a historical vestige, but if you spend too much time studying the shuttered colonial edifice, local folks might get edgy, thinking you're a spy of sorts.
Turn right off of Phung Hung onto:

9. Hang Vai
Translated as "Cloth Street," Hang Vai is the bamboo district. The busy exteriors of small warehouses are lined with stands of cut bamboo poles, some more than two stories in height. This is the raw material for those wonderful Doctor Seuss scaffoldings you see on construction sites. The shops also sell bamboo tobacco pipes of the "bong" variety, some quite elaborate. At the corner of Hang Vai and north-south Hang Ga, keep an eye out for the communal house at no. 44 Hang Ga St.: A corner door cut into the white plaster and flanked by Chinese script ushers you into a small courtyard area with banyan trees and a small temple to Bach Ma, the White Horse, a god associated with Hanoi. Carrying on east on Hang Vai, look for the entrance to the communal house at no. 7 Hang Vai.
Heading east, Hang Vai becomes:

10. Lan Ong Street
One of the most interesting parts of the Old Quarter, Lan Ong Street is still home to a large enclave of ethnic Chinese who sell the herbs and medicines of old from small storefronts that date back to the origins of the quarter. The best shops are on the right side as you head east. Here you'll find picturesque little interiors with walls lined in massive dark wood cabinets with tiny drawers and buckets and bins all around with the most curious assortment of dried goods you'll ever see. This is the kind of place where, sadly, you might be able to buy a bear's gall bladder or a monkey's paw. The buildings all along this short stretch are originals dating back as far as the 17th century. Look for the busy elementary school at no. 42 Lan Ong, which was once the communal house of the area's Chinese population. Just across from the converted communal house and all along the length of the street, look for low roofs and narrow entries, especially those with tile roofs covered in moss, as these are original Chinese homes.
A quick left (north) turn brings you to:

11. Cha Ca Street
Following Lan Ong Street, heading east, cross the famous Cha Ca Street (Fish St.). Make a left (north) and look for the Cha Ca La Vong restaurant, which serves one of Hanoi's most famed dishes.

12. Take a Break--Just across from Cha Ca La Vong restaurant, you'll find the Hoa Sua Cafe (11B Cha Ca St.; tel. 04/923-1500), a combination school and restaurant (they now have a number of locations throughout the city), where young students serve good coffee and cakes.
Returning to eastbound Lan Ong, turn left (north) onto Hang Duong.

13. Hang Duong Street
Hang Duong Street (Sugar St.) is lined with traditional constructions, foremost of which is the communal house on the left as you go north at no. 38 Hang Duong St. It has a stunning banyan tree in the courtyard and a dark, alluring charm to its smoky interior. Note: Hang Duong is a pedestrian area on weekend nights and becomes a busy little market for tourist trinkets and local goods.
A short detour off of Hang Duong is the 13th-century Thanh Ha Communal House, just a short walk east on Ngo Gach Street (Brick St.).
Continue north on Hang Duong, then turn right on:

14. Hang Chieu
Follow Hang Chieu east across the northern end of the Old Quarter to Quan Chuong Gate, the only remaining gate of the city's once-formidable fortifications. From here, go right (south) onto Dao Duy Tu Street and look for the small entrance to the Huong Nghia Communal House on the left side near the corner of Cho Gao Street. The communal house has an entrance open to visitors who bring offerings and light incense.

15. Take Break--Tired? Thirsty? On the corner adjacent to the communal house on Hang Chieu is a popular bia hoi stand and restaurant where you can get a mug of local brew and get out of the heat for just 1,500 VND (10¢).
Turn right onto Nguyen Sieu.

6. Nguyen Sieu Street
Nguyen Sieu, a street named for a noted 18th-century scholar and lined with colonial buildings (your architecture-spotting muscles must be strong by now). On the right, keep an eye out for the small alley entrance to the Co Luong Communal House, a colorful temple surrounded by modern relief sculptures, some of quite fanciful Alice in Wonderland mushrooms and frightening demons.
Turn left (south) on Hang Giay Street. Go straight 1 block. Then turn left on Hang Buom Street. Immediately on your left is the important:

17. Bach Ma Temple (The White Horse Temple)
Located at no. 76 Hang Buom St., the Bach Ma Temple is open from 7:30 to 11:30am and 1:30 to 6pm daily (until 9pm on holidays). Built in A.D. 1010, the temple is dedicated to the White Horse of legend, which, it is said, helped the early king of the Viet people, Ly, decide where and how to defend his city. The temple interior is a grand courtyard of massive red pillars and large Buddhist statuary and altars. Although the temple remains open, at press time it was under construction; for the time being, plan on tip-toeing around construction crews.
Continue east along:

18. Hang Buom Street
From the Bach Ma Temple, continue east on Hang Buom (Sail St.). Once adjacent to a small tributary of the To Lich River, which brought goods to the city, Hang Buom was where local merchant vessels came to refit their ships. Look for the many colonial buildings and traditional Vietnamese houses, as well as a communal house at no. 22 Hang Buom.
As Hang Buom curves to the right (south), it becomes:

19. Ma May Street
Ma May is the beginning of the busiest budget tourist areas of the Old Quarter. In and among Internet cafes and tourist restaurants (often one and the same), you'll find good examples of traditional and colonial buildings. The Huong Tuong Communal House is at no. 64 Ma May, and one of the most interesting sights in the city can be found at no. 87 Ma May, a refurbished and restored traditional house. Here, for a fee of just 20,000 VND ($1.30), a young docent dressed in a traditional flowing ao dai gown will take you on an informative tour of the building and can explain important details about life in the Old Quarter in centuries past. With the careful renovations done by a UNESCO-funded, French- and Canadian-backed organization, this classic home offers a unique opportunity to have a close look at the interior detail of a traditional Old Quarter home. Also see the similarly renovated property at no. 38 Hang Dao St.
Ma May also houses some fine services, such as Tamarind Café, where you can grab something to eat, check your e-mail, and shop for trinkets.
Heading south on Ma May, turn right at its terminus with:

20. Hang Bac Street
Heading west on Hang Bac, you're in the heart of the backpacker area. Here you're sure to be assailed on all sides by touts and hucksters and have your pick of budget tours from the many storefronts that line this busy street. Hang Bac means Silver Street and the silver these days is mostly the stuff coming from your pocket and falling into tour operators' hands, though you still can find some silver (and gold) jewelry makers and sellers.
As you approach the intersection of Dinh Liet Street, look right and you'll see the large Chuong Vang Theater at no. 72 Hang Bac, which was the stronghold of troops who laid siege to the French after the August Revolution in 1945.
You'll find good shopping and lots of goods and services in this area. You can finish the tour here, or check out one more sight worth seeing.
Head west on Hang Bac. Turn left (south) on:

21. Hang Dao
Immediately on your right, don't miss another fine example of a restored traditional Old Quarter house, much like the one on Ma May (and run by the same folks). No. 38 Hang Dao is a two-story home that was once owned by silk merchants. Quite spacious and elaborate (silk merchants were wealthy), you'll see how an Old Quarter house was set up, including where the worship area was set (now an office), as well as where the family lived, cooked, and worked. Helpful docents guide you through for a fee of 20,000 VND ($1.30) (or for free if you've got your ticket from Ma May St.).
Hang Dao continues south and ends at Hang Gai and the Dong Kinh Nghia Thuc Square (The Tonkin Free School Movement Sq.). Look for the large ocean-liner-shaped building that overlooks the square and Hoan Kiem Lake to the south.

22. Take a Break--On the fourth floor of the most prominent building on Dong Kinh Nghia Thuc Square, find the popular Highland's Coffee, a good place to meet up after your walk or to rest your bones after completing the circle.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$110

$70

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees
No lunch included

 


 

Hanoi in a Cyclopousse and Dinner (Tour code VI-1105)
 

8.00 am transfer by car to visit Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum and Museum, One pillar pagoda, Tran Quoc pagoda, Quan Thanh temple. In the afternoon, visit to Temple of Literature, Army Museum, Hanoi Flag Tower. Wandering around Hoan Kiem lake then visit Ngoc Son Temple and enjoy two hours cyclo trip around the trading area in Hanoi Old Quarter with dinner at Hanoi Seasons. Tour ends about 16.30 pm.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$150

$95

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees
Cylco fee (one person/cyclo)
Dinner at local restaurant


 

   

 

Hanoi Perfume Pagoda - Fullday (Tour code VI-1106)
 

0730: Pick up at your hotel, depart to visit Perfume Pagoda. The Perfume Pagoda (Chua Huong) is in fact a vast complex of pagodas and shrines built into the limestone Huong Tich mountains. From the middle of the second lunar month to the end of the third lunar month, it is the site of a very popular religious festival which draws large numbers of pilgrims. You first start the trip by boating on a river among a beautiful karstic landscape, then you hike quite a long trail, which is all lined up with stands of food and religious souvenirs, to reach eventually the main sanctuary in a cave. Along the way, there are a great number of other places to worship. It is a festive occasion for the Vietnamese who often make the trip in large groups.
Enjoy a 1.30 hours boat trip on Yen (Swallow Bird) stream and visit Trinh temple before disembarking at Ben Duc (Duc quay). Following is a short trek to Thien Tru pagoda (the main pagoda). Get up to the mountain peak by cable car to visit pagoda inside grotto Huong Tich, where people often come to pray for health, luck, ... etc. Return to Thien Tru Pagoda area on foot for lunch. After lunch, rowing back to Yen boat quay and we will ride back.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$130

$90

 



Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees
Lunch at local restaurant
Boat fee and cable car fee


 

 

 

Hanoi Thay & Tay Phuong Pagoda - Halfday (Tour code VI-1107)
 

You can depart either in the morning at 0800 or in the afternoon at 1400 depending on your convenience to visit first Thay (Teacher) Pagoda. Thay Pagoda, alias Thien Phuc Tu Pagoda, was built in the 11th century during the reign of King Ly Nhan Tong. At first, it was a small pagoda managed by Priest Tu Dao Hanh. The pagoda was initially built according to Sino-Vietnamese character Tam - this character is formed by 3 hyphens parallel to each other.
The pagoda therefore consists of 3 sections: Ha Pagoda, Trung Pagoda, and Thuong Pagoda. The outer part, Ha Pagoda, is a place for offerings and ceremonies; the middle part, Trung Pagoda, is a place for worship of Buddha; and finally, the inner part is a place for worship of Priest Tu Dao Hanh. An automated sandalwood statue of Tu Dao Hanh that stands and sits is located in a red lacquered shrine trimmed with gold and covered with a curtain.
Continue to visit Tay Phuong pagoda which is just very near to Thay pagoda. Tay Phuong architecture describes as:"The central construction has a directing role and is consequently raised higher than the others. It symbolizes Heaven. The construction at the rear plays the role of a foundation: it symbolizes the earth. The construction closest to the world of man stands in front. The whole structure is the symbol of Thai Cuc (the Prime Principle, from which the whole world derives). The double tier of the roof symbolizes the double principle, Luong Nghi, yin and yang. The slopes, the roof on the four sides symbolize the four elements of heaven, Tu Tuong; the sun, moon, stars and deities, while the slopes on the eight sides stand for the Eight Signs of the Sacred Octagon (Bat Quai)"


Return to your hotel

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$110

$70

 


Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees


 


 

 

Hoa Binh Da Reservoir, Tru Muong Ethnic Village visit - Fullday (Tour code VI-1108)
 

0800: Depart from your hotel in Hanoi to Hoa Binh which is 75km northwest of Hanoi. Take a boat trip on Da Reservoir to visit Muong ethnic minority village which live by the Da (Black) river. The flooding of the Da River has displaced a large number of farmers for about 200 km upstream. The dam is part of major hydro-electric scheme which generates power for the north. In 1994, a 500kV power line was extended from this area to the south, freeing Saigon from the seasonal power shortages that often blacked out the city for up to three days at a time.Though the dam is just 5 km from Hoabinh, it’s best to visit the reservoir by taking a spur road that cuts off from Highway 6 at Dong Bang Junction (60 km from Hoabinh).
Continue to visit the largest hydroelectric power plant before returning back to Hanoi and drop off at your hotel
Lunch at local restaurant inclusive

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$185

$110

 

       



 

Inclusive
Transportation
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking guide
Entrance fees
Lunch at local restaurant
Boat fee



 

 

Hanoi – Duong Lam village – Hanoi (Lunch) (Tour code #1109)
 

08.00: pick up at hotel and travel west of Hanoi to Duong Lam village, a purely agricultural village of the Northern Red River delta where still preserved are many hundred-year-old houses. Upon arrival, bike along tiny ancient alleys to visit Mong Phu temple in Mong Phu hamlet - the only hamlet whose original village entrance gate remains intact, dedicated to national heroes. Continue riding around the village to discover the daily life and farming, practice of Vietnamese peasants along the terrace with a stop in two ancient houses: the biggest ancient house was build 200 years ago and the most ancient house dates back to 400 years ago.
After lunch, visit Ngo Quyen temple and Phung Hung temple, dedicated to two national heroes. Again biking to Mia Pagoda, built in 15th century. Drive back to Hanoi and reach your hotel around 4.30 pm.

 

Valid from 01-Apr-2013 to 30-Sep-2014

All prices are per person

 

Single

Twin

 

Private

$140

$90

 

       



 

Inclusive
Private car/ van
Mineral water and wet wipe
Private English/French speaking local guide
Entrance fees
Bicycle
Lunch as stated in the program



 

 
A:Available - This tour is available for booking.
R:On Request - This tour is on request only
All prices are per person.
If you are interested, please contact your local agent to make the booking or alternatively email us at reservations@toursite.com.au